ATAROTH


ATAROTH
ATAROTH (Heb. עֲטָ רוֹת), name of several biblical towns or settlements. (1) A city in the territory beyond the Jordan, conquered from the Amorites by Moses and the Israelites and allotted to Gad (Num. 32:3, 34), even though it was situated within the inheritance of Reuben (cf. Josh. 13:16). According to the Stele of Mesha, king of Moab, he captured the city from Israel: "Now the men of Gad had always dwelt in the land of Ataroth and the king of Israel had built Ataroth" (lines 10–11). It is now called Khirbat ʿAttārūs, 8 mi. (13 km.) N.W. of Dibon (modern Dhībān) and about 10 mi. (16 km.) E. of the Dead Sea. Moabite, Nabatean, Roman, Byzantine, and Arab potsherds have been found there. (2) Atroth-Shophan   (עַטְרׁת שׁוֹפָן), a place in the vicinity of the above-mentioned Ataroth (Num. 32:35). (3) A city on the southern border of Ephraim (Josh. 16:2) which is perhaps identical with Atroth-Addar (עַטְרוֹת אַדָּר; Josh. 18:13). The Palestinian Targum translates Tomer Devorah ("palm tree of Deborah"; Judg. 4:5) as Atroth Devorah. A village with that name was located in this region in Byzantine times and is also mentioned in the Crusader period as Atarbereth (Atar Be'erot). (4) A city on the northern border of Ephraim (Josh. 16:7); its suggested identification is ʿAwja al-Fawqā or Tell Sheikh al-Dhiyāb, north of Jericho. (5) Atroth-Beth-Joab (עַטְרוֹת בֵּ ית יוֹאָב) in Judah (I Chron. 2:54) is unidentified. -BIBLIOGRAPHY: (1) Aharoni, Land, index; Avi-Yonah, Land, 152; Press, Ereẓ, 4 (1955), 693–4; Glueck, in: ASOR, 18–19 (1939), 135; idem, in: HUCA, 23 (1) (1950–51), 126 ff. (2) Abel, Geog, 2 (1938), 255 ff. (3) Alt, in: PJB, 21 (1925), 25; 22 (1926), 33; 23 (1927), 32; Elliger, in: ZDPV, 53 (1930), 279 ff. (Michael Avi-Yonah)

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ataroth — (עטרות) means crowns in Hebrew. In the Bible, the name Ataroth refers to one of two or perhaps three towns:*A town east of the Jordan in Gilead, mentioned in Numbers 32:3 and 32:34, in the territory of the Tribe of Gad. Ataroth lay within the… …   Wikipedia

  • ATAROTH — civitas in tribu Gad. Numer. c. 32. v. 3. et 34 …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Ataroth —    Crowns.    1) A city east of Jordan, not far from Gilead (Num. 32:3).    2) A town on the border of Ephraim and Benjamin (Josh. 16:2, 7), called also Ataroth adar (16:5). Now ed Da rieh.    3) Ataroth, the house of Joab (1 Chr. 2:54), a town… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • ATAROTH-ADAR — civitas in tribu Ephraim, Ios. c. 16. v. 5 …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Mesha Stele — in the Louvre Museum. The Mesha Stele (popularized in the 19th century as the Moabite Stone ) is a black basalt stone bearing an inscription by the 9th century BC ruler Mesha of Moab in Jordan. The inscription was set up about 840 BC as a… …   Wikipedia

  • 'Atara — Other transcription(s)    Arabic عطارة    Also spelled Attara (official) Ataroth (unofficial) View of A …   Wikipedia

  • MOAB — (Heb. מוֹאָב), a land E. of the Jordan and the Dead Sea, one of Israel s neighbors in biblical times. The highland of Moab extends southward to the Zered River (Wādī al Ḥasāʾ), eastward to the desert, and westward to the Dead Sea. Its northern… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • List of Biblical names — This is a list of names from the Bible, mainly taken from the 19th century public domain resource: : Hitchcock s New and Complete Analysis of the Holy Bible by Roswell D. Hitchcock, New York: A. J. Johnson, 1874, c1869.Each name is given with its …   Wikipedia

  • Arnon (western Jordan) — Arnon (Hebrew: אַרְנוֹן) is a river and wadi in western Jordan, known in modern times in Arabic as Wadi Mujib . The Hebrew name means perhaps noisy, a term which well describes the latter part of the course of the river. Its length is about 45… …   Wikipedia

  • Tribal allotments of Israel — According to the Book of Joshua, Joshua divided the newly conquered land of Canaan into parcels, and assigned them to the Tribes of Israel by lot. The Book of Joshua describes the parcels by giving landmarks along the borders, or in some cases by …   Wikipedia


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